Sleep FAQ


Why Use a Sleep Coach?

There’s a lot of conflicting information online, and while there’s hundreds of books on the subject of infant sleep, it’s hard to know where to start and what will work for you and your family.  I know from personal experience what it’s like to be exhausted, and have a challenging sleeper, and how to put all of the information that you’re reading together.  When you work with me, I’ll provide you with a very straightforward and easy to follow plan that’s gentle and effective for both you and your little one, as well as provide you support along the way. 


How Much Sleep Does My Child Need?


More than you would think!
Babies and young children need anywhere between 12-18 hours of sleep per day, depending on their age.


Here are some basic guidelines for different age groups:

0-3 months: 16-18 hours PLUS per day

3-6 months: about 15 hours per day

6-12 months: about 14 hours per day

12 months and up: 12-13 hours per day

 Children are constantly exposed to new stimulus, and everything that they see, smell, taste, touch and hear is new to them.  When they are adequately rested, they will be able to consolidate the things they have learned, and will be much happier and less temperamental through the day.  If your child is not getting the sleep that they need, there’s a chance that YOU aren’t getting the sleep that you need either – this can be linked to everything from postpartum depression to weight gain in new mothers. 
 

How Can I Tell When My Child Is Getting Tired?


 One of the most common mistakes that parents make is waiting until their child is overtired before they put them to sleep.  This makes falling asleep much harder for the child, and more stressful for parents.  Many parents will then assume their child won’t nap, or doesn’t need to nap, which couldn’t be further from the truth! 

Children tire much faster than adults, and, an early sign of tiredness is that they start to lose interest in playing (either with people or toys) or you may catch them gazing into the distance.  By the time your child exhibits the more obvious tired signs (such as yawning, arching their back, pulling their ears or rubbing their eyes) they are often on their way to being overtired (if they aren’t there already!).  When a child is put to sleep before they are overtired, they should drift into sleep easily. 



How Many Naps Should My Child Be Taking Each Day?


 One of the most common mistakes that parents make is waiting until their child is overtired before they put them to sleep.  This makes falling asleep much harder for the child, and more stressful for parents.  Many parents will then assume their child won’t nap, or doesn’t need to nap, which couldn’t be further from the truth.


When Should My Baby Be Sleeping Through the Night?


Every child is different, but assuming your baby is healthy, you can expect 12 hours of solid nighttime sleep by about 6 months in age.  I work with families with babies of all ages (newborns too!) to help expedite this process, and, in most cases by 3 months, we can work together to gently get your child sleeping through the night!